Britain First leader and deputy leader guilty of religiously-aggravated harassment

Jayda Fransen the deputy leader of Britain First was in 2016 convicted of religiously aggravated harassment of a Muslim woman

Jayda Fransen the deputy leader of Britain First was in 2016 convicted of religiously aggravated harassment of a Muslim woman

Jayda Fransen and Paul Golding, leaders of the far-right group Britain First, were found guilty Wednesday of religiously aggravated harassment after trying to promote Islamophobia during a trial past year.

Paul Golding, the leader of extremist group Britain First, and its deputy leader Jayda Fransen were jailed for 18 weeks and 36 weeks respectively after a trial in the Folkstone Magistrates' Court.

Jayda Fransen, 32, and Paul Golding, 36, were arrested together on Wednesday, May 10 2017, after a number of incidents had been committed in the Thanet area. Golding was found guilty of one charge, the BBC reported.

The pair were also charged with other incidents connected to the trial which took place throughout May a year ago.

Fransen and Golding stood trial at Folkestone Magistrates' Court in January 2018.

Paul Golding, 36, and Jayda Fransen, 31, were arrested for distributing leaflets and posting videos online during a Muslim gang-rape trial previous year.

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Leader Paul Golding, 36, and deputy leader Jayda Fransen, 32, were arrested over the distribution of leaflets and the posting of online videos during a gang-rape trial in May past year in Kent. The case descended into chaos as Judge Barron attempted to continue his sentence and impose restraining orders so the pair could not contact victims and witnesses in the case.

He told the court that Fransen and Golding were "well-known", "controversial" and "generate their own publicity", but his verdict was based "solely on admissible evidence heard in court".

'It was a campaign to draw attention to the race, religion and immigrant background of the defendants'.

Prosecutor Jaswant Narwal said the case had demonstrated Golding and Franson "were not merely exercising their right to free speech but were instead aiming religiously aggravated abuse at innocent members of the public".

May's spokesman said at the time: "Britain First seeks to divide communities by their use of hateful narratives that peddle lies and stoke tensions".

Sentencing has been delayed - but is due to take place today.

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