Fastest growing black hole discovered

A monster black hole has been discovered, and it's growing very fast (but it's far, far away)

The fastest-growing black hole in the universe eats a sun every 48 hours - and Australian astronomers have found it

Astronomers at ANU have found the fastest-growing black hole known in the Universe, describing it as a monster that devours a mass equivalent to our sun every two days.

In this case, the researchers discovered the black hole which, according to their estimates, was as big as 20 billion suns and growing by a percent every one million years.

Now scientists are on the hunt for another black hole that might beat out this black hole's appetite and give them a glimpse into the inner workings of the universe only a few billion years after it formed.

If we had this monster sitting in the center of our Milky Way, it would look 10 times brighter than a full moon. Wolf further added that it would have appeared as an unbelievably bright "pin-point star", which could wash out almost every star present in the celestial sphere.

It was detected at the ANU Siding Spring Observatory.

Since it took this long for its light to reach us, spotting this supermassive black hole is like looking back through time, when the universe was just 1.4-billion-years-old.

If this bright black hole would have been in our galaxy, astronomers say that it would outshine all the stars in the sky.

Introducing Microsoft Surface Hub 2
Microsoft's new Surface Hub 2's design is a huge leap forward from the first-gen Surface Hub, and it looks absolutely lovely . Making products stronger through collaboration, whether they're in the same room or separated by thousands of miles.

A black hole is an intense gravitational pull that sucks in everything in its path, including light. Wolf said that with the expansion of the Universe, space gets expanded, which stretches the waves of light and transforms their color.

Though the team has no idea how this monstrous black hole grew so big when the universe was still in its infancy, they plan to continue their search for other fast-growing black holes, possibly faster than this one, in the universe.

Astronomers are not yet sure how this black hole grew so large, so quickly in the early days of the universe.

The mammoth black hole also emanates vast amounts of radiated X-rays, which would probably "make life on Earth impossible", the astronomer pointed out.

Dr Wolf said the Gaia satellite confirmed the object that they had found was sitting still, meaning that it was far away and it was a candidate to be a very large quasar.

Dubbed J215728.21-360215.1, the supermassive black hole was recently noticed by the before-mentioned Dr. Wolf and his colleagues.

In a paper due to appear in Publications of the Astronomical Society of Australia, the ANU team explained that they spotted the fast-growing quasar by combining motion data from the European Space Agency's Gaia satellite with photometry from the SkyMapper and NASA's Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE).

Latest News