Soyuz rocket fails mid-air, ISS crew safe

Cosmonaut Alexei Ovchinin and NASA astronaut Nick Hague at the pre-launch ceremony in Kazakhstan

Cosmonaut Alexei Ovchinin and NASA astronaut Nick Hague at the pre-launch ceremony in Kazakhstan

Two astronauts from the U.S. and Russia have made an emergency landing after a Russian booster rocket carrying them into orbit to the International Space Station failed after launch, NASA says.

They are set to make an emergency landing in Kazakhstan, with both crew members live and talking to mission control.

The rocket took off from Kazakhstan with Russian Cosmonaut Alexey Ovchinin and United States astronaut Nick Hague on board.

An American astronaut and a Russian cosmonaut returned safely to Earth Thursday after a Russian booster rocket carrying them to the International Space Station failed shortly after launch.

The Kremlin confirmed the men had survived.

A duo of astronauts from the US and Russian Federation has blasted off for a mission on the International Space Station.

A Soyuz rocket takes off from Baikonur Cosmodrome.

Google Pixel 3 First impressions
David Ruddock, the managing editor of Android Police, recently tweeted and insisted Google has a Pixel Slate tablet in the works. It has been created to blend in with your home - the screen automatically adjusts to the level and type of light in the room.

Search and rescue crews are on their way to the Soyuz capsule, and were likely to reach it by 11.30pm, NZ time.

Rescue crews are now heading towards the emergency landing site in the barren Kazakh steppe to provide support for the crew.

The US space agency Nasa said there was an "issue with the booster".

"Teams have been in contact with the crew".

'The capsule is returning via a ballistic descent, which is a sharper angle of landing compared to normal. They were scheduled to dock with the space station later Thursday and spend six-months there.

"Search and rescue teams are en route to the landing location and we await further updates".

Latest News