Meet the winners who have made history in the 2018 midterms

Max Rose in October 2018

Max Rose in October 2018

In Georgia, the race for governor between Democrat Stacey Abrams - who is vying to be the first black woman governor in the US - and Republican Brian Kemp remains too close to call. "This is gonna be the most diverse freshmen class of women that we've ever brought in by far, in race, profession, and age", she said.

Ocasio-Cortez' victory over Republican Anthony Pappas, an economics professor, had been widely expected since the Democratic primary in June, when she scored an unanticipated upset over 10-term U.S. Rep. Joe Crowley.

These wins were mostly fueled by the Democratic Party, which put a record numbers of women on the ballot.

Going into the midterm elections, 19 per cent of the Governor, Senate and House seats were held by women. Omar is also the first Somali-American congresswoman, while Tlaib is the chamber's first Palestinian-American.

At least 99 women will represent Americans in the House, surpassing the previous record of 84.

Sharice Davids of Kansas and Deb Haaland of New Mexico won their races, becoming the first Native American women in Congress. Davids racked up another distinction as the first openly LGBTQ person to represent Kansas.

Trump warns House Democrats against investigating his administration
The Democrat surged in the latter part of the year , polling neck and neck with Noem, but fell just short on Election Day. This was a defining moment for them, as they saw the election as a way to regain a modicum of control over government.

In New York, Democrat Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez became the youngest woman elected to Congress at just 29 years old.

According to Guardian, winners of seats in the House include Latina congresswomen from Texas, the Democrats' Veronica Escobar and Sylvia Garcia, while Ilhan Omar of Minnesota and Rashida Tlaib of MI will be the first Muslim congresswomen.

These new records represent the culmination of a record-setting year for female candidates.

On Tuesday night Democrats won control of the House, delivering a major blow to Trump in the first election since he became president in 2016.

Nearly 80% of voters in a CNN exit poll said it's very or somewhat important that more women and racial minorities be elected to public office, with two-thirds of white voters agreeing. In the House, 96 women have reportedly won or are projected to win their races. Nine women will call various governors' mansions across the USA home. In New Jersey, Democratic Gov. Jim McGreevy, elected in 2001, had been outed as gay while in office.

The last time women voted for Democrats anywhere near that margin was more than 30 years ago. Missouri's Claire McCaskill and North Dakota's Heidi Heitkamp were both vulnerable as Democrats in deep red states, and a lot of people are pointing to their votes against Brett Kavanaugh as what cost them their elections.

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